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In My Belly in 30: Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle (Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe)

In My Belly in 30: Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle (Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe)

I have a serious addiction to popcorn. Not just any popcorn. Chocolate drizzled popcorn. Oh lawd, nothing makes me happier than munching on a fresh batch of drizzled popcorn!

My addiction began last July, right after we moved to Flagstaff. Mr. OG and I were super excited because Flagstaff has a Sam’s Club, which neither of us had ever been to. So we went to check it out, and I ended up purchasing a nice big family-sized bag of Popcorn Indiana Black and White Drizzlecorn.

 



I sampled it after we got home, and then proceeded to eat half the bag in one sitting. By the next day, it was long gone. I couldn’t believe the party in my mouth! So, the next time we went to Sam’s Club, I got two bags, which lasted two days in our house.

Then I started craving the stuff. Like big time, ALL the time. So I thought I’d better stock up. We headed to Sam’s Club, and I went straight to my Popcorn Indiana end cap. To my absolute HORROR, it was full of tortilla chips! I frantically searched the snack aisles, and then desperately consulted a store associate. He explained that they ended their contract with Popcorn Indiana and no longer carry the drizzlecorn. Broken-hearted, I sulked home.

I just couldn’t live like that, so I began online research. I could NOT BELIEVE that my lovely bags of popcorn I was paying five bucks and change for at Sam’s Club were $15 + on Amazon. The best deal I could find was ten smaller-sized bags for $40. So yeah, I bought them. And ate my ten small bags in five days.

 



I knew Mr. OG was not going to let that continue. He asked me if any other popcorn would work. Smart Food? Moose Munch? “NO!” I replied. “It has to be Popcorn Indiana!”

You see, no other chocolate popcorn, or flavored popcorn, is quite like theirs. They have this wonderful sort of crunchy sugar coating on the outside of the popcorn, and then they drizzle it with dark chocolate and white chocolate. It’s HEAVEN. And nobody else makes it that way.

So I set out to create the perfect copycat. Do you know what happened? I made it BETTER. Now I won’t buy Popcorn Indiana’s Drizzlecorn, because my homemade stuff takes less than half an hour to make,  and is freaking delicious!

I can’t stop. I make a batch at least every other day. It just hits all of my taste buds in all the right ways. It’s sweet and salty, crunchy and melty, and the most perfect snack I’ve ever encountered. There’s no doubt I’m completely addicted. And I’m gonna be a doll and share the recipe with you. But I warn you, you may become addicted, too.

 

Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle

Ingredients:

 

Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle-Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe

 

1 bag butter popcorn

2 Tablespoons butter

1/2 teaspoon salt (I like pink Himalayan)

2 Tablespoons water

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup milk chocolate chips

1/3 cup white chocolate chips

 

***Side point*** If you can get some of this stuff, do it:

 

You’re popcorn will turn out just fine with regular vanilla, but this Madagascar vanilla really kicks up the flavor and makes it all that much more AMAZING! If you can’t find it at your local grocery store, get it here.

Instructions:

Put small saucepan over medium-low heat. Add butter, salt, water, vanilla, and sugar, and let heat to simmer, stirring occasionally.

 

 

 

While it’s heating, pop your popcorn.

 

 

Also, measure out your chocolate chips into two small bowls.

 

 

Your butter mixture only needs to heat for about five minutes. It should look like this:

 

 

When it does (like I said, about five minutes) turn off the heat.

Dump your popcorn into a large bowl.

 

 

Drizzle the butter mixture over the popcorn, 1/3 at a time, tossing the popcorn thoroughly with tongs between each third.

 

 

When the popcorn is completely covered in the butter mixture, spread it out evenly on a foil lined cookie sheet.

Microwave each bowl of chocolate separately, until melted. I do the milk chocolate first, because it looks better on the popcorn to have the milk chocolate between the white popcorn and the white chocolate. It really makes the white chocolate drizzle stand out. I also microwave each bowl for 30 seconds, stir thoroughly, and then pop it back in for another 30 seconds.

 

 

Using the milk chocolate first, drizzle the whole bowl over the popcorn, careful to do so as evenly as possible. Follow with the white chocolate.

 

 

Put popcorn into fridge for about 10 minutes to harden chocolate.

 

 

When chocolate is set, which happens very quickly, use a spatula to break it up. Put the into ziplocks bags.

 

 

I divide mine in half between two half-gallon zip locks.

 

 

That’s all there is to it! Except to enjoy!

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This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!



I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Tutorial: 3 Easy Ways to Upcycle Last Year’s Calendar

Hello my broads! Have you put up your new calendars yet? I received a fantastic calendar as a Christmas gift from a coworker this year called “Nuns Having Fun.” It’s all pictures of nuns bowling, bicycling, sailing, etc. I love it! You can buy it here.

 



I SO loved last year’s calendar, though. It was a beautifully illustrated work of art, called “The Lang 2017 Love to Cook Calendar,” with paintings of fat chefs creating amazing concoctions on nice thick paper. It broke my heart to take it down, and I just couldn’t throw it away.

So I started to think, how can I use this expired beauty? Broads, you’re in for treat!

Today I’m going to show you three fabulous ways you can upcycle last year’s calendar. I promise, you will be so excited, you’ll start collecting everyone else’s old calendars, too. You’ll also realize these three projects are just the beginning, and I bet while you are making these, your brain will be coming up with a ton of other ways you can use your old calendars!

Let’s get started on project numero uno!

 

 

Project 1: Pen/Pencil/Paintbrush Holders:

For this first simple project, you’ll need your calendar, four empty tin cans, a ruler, glue, a Sharpee, and scissors (not pictured).

 

 

The first thing you want to do is measure your can to see how wide you need to cut your paper. Make sure you measure only the flat part that the paper will be glued to, and not the lip of the can. Mine were about 4 inches.

 

 

Next, you need to find four pictures or areas of a picture that you like. Measure the four inch width and mark it across your paper with the Sharpee.

 

 

Then use the ruler to connect the marks and make a straight line. Take your scissors and cut along the line. That should give you a nice four inch wide strip of paper. Repeat the process with your other three papers.

 

 

You’ll end up with four strips of four inch wide paper, like so:

 

 

Now grab a can. squeeze a line of glue vertically down the can.

 

 

Take a strip of your paper. Starting at the glue line, wrap the paper around your can. You’ll want to make a new glue line about every 1 1/2 to 2 inches to make sure your paper is nice and sealed to the can. When you get to the end, cut off the excess paper.

 

 

Then you can draw a line of glue at the very end to seal the edge of the paper flat, like this:

 

 

Make sure you press it firmly and hold it for a few seconds so it stays flat and doesn’t raise on the edges. Repeat the gluing process with your other three cans and papers. Before you know it, viola! You have gorgeous holders for your art utensils!

 

 

I took my project a step further and you may be able to as well, depending on what you have laying around your home. I had a drink caddy with four glasses and a jug that I never use. I took the glasses and jug out, and put my cans in, which created an awesome little art utensil caddy. So cute!

 

 

That’s project one, and it was easy as pie!

 

 

Project 2: Bookmarks

For this project you’ll need your calendar, a paper cutter, glue, a Sharpee (not pictured), a hole punch, some ribbon, a ruler, and a piece of sturdy cardboard.

 

 

The first thing you want to do is measure and mark the width of your bookmark on the cardboard. I’m doing 1 1/2 inches.

 

 

Connect your dots and use the ruler to draw a straight line for cutting.

 

 

Use the paper cutter to ensure very straight lines, like so:

 

 

Next, you’ll want to cut your calendar paper about two and a half times as wide as your cardboard piece, and about and inch longer. So for instance, my book mark is 1 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches long. So I’m going to cut my calendar paper 3 3/4 (1 1/2 X 2.5) inches wide and 6 (5 1) inches long.

 

 

Put your cardboard piece on top of your freshly cut calendar paper. Now get your glue and line both short ends of your cardboard with glue.

 

 

Next, fold the ends of the calendar paper over the cardboard, and press them hard to get the glue to seal them.

 

 

You’ll now line one of the long sides of the cardboard with glue, and fold the paper over, pressing hard again to get a nice firm seal.

 

 

Put a line of glue across the middle of your bookmark, like so:

 

 

Then simply fold the last end over so your cardboard is completely wrapped in the calendar paper. You’ll also want to put an extra line of glue on the short ends, and press nice and hard so they seal better, like this:

 

 

At this point, put your bookmark(s) under a book or something else flat and heavy. This will allow for flat drying. It’ll take about 30 to 60 minutes to get dry enough. I did two bookmarks. You can do however many you want.

 

 

After drying, punch a hole in one end, centered.

 

 

Take your ribbon and cut it to the length you want. I did about 8 inches, giving myself a little extra to work with.

 

 

Thread your ribbon through the hole punch and tie it securely. Trim if necessary.

 

 

There you have it! Lovely bookmarks!

 

 

These were super simple, and since I’m always in need of bookmarks for my cookbooks, they were put to use right away!

 

 

 

Project 3: Mini Pocket Notebook

Our last project is a simply adorable mini pocket notebook. You will need your old calendar, a paper cutter, a Sharpee (not pictured), glue, a hole punch, a ruler, computer paper, and twine.

 

 

First things first, you want to measure how wide your paper will be. Think of how wide you want your notebook and then double it, because you will be folding your paper in half.

I actually cut out a few pieces and folded them to give myself a good idea of exact widths and lengths. I settled on 5 inches, so I will have 2 1/2 inch wide paper in my mini notebook.

 

 

Use the paper cutter to cut your paper to the length you measured. See how I put my paper at the 5 inch mark?

 

 

Your calendar paper will be the outside cover of the notebook. I wanted mine 1/4 inch bigger on all sides than my white paper. So that would be 8 3/4 inches long (because my paper was the standard 8 1/2 by 11), and 5 1/4 inches wide. Follow the same process of measuring, drawing your lines, and using the paper cutter to get everything nice and straight.

 

Now, fold your white papers in half, and use your hole punch to make two holes. They will be on the folded side, about 1/8 to 1/4 inch from the edges. Since I didn’t get a good photo, I drew up a quick diagram to show you what I mean. The two circles are approximately where you want your holes punched.

Make sure you punch the holes while the papers are folded in half, so when you unfold them you will have four holes all together.  You will need to punch two holes into your cover paper (old calendar) as well, in the exact same spot as the white paper, so they will line up perfectly.

 

 

Next, measure out two pieces of twine.  I did mine at 12 inches, because I wasn’t sure how much I would need. If you plan on just tying a secure double knot, you probably only need each string to be about 4 inches long. But if you want to try a cute bow, 12 inches is a good amount to work with. You can always trim them down later.

 

 

Now put your white paper and your cover paper together, lining up the holes. Thread the twine through the holes and tie, making sure it’s very secure. I settled on a double knot because I’m terrible at tying secure bows.

 

 

It should look something like this:

 

 

You can stop at this point if you want, and have a wonderful mini notebook. However, I like to do one last step because I think it makes my mini notebook a bit more professional and polished. What I do is glue the very first white page and the very last white page to the cover page, like this:

 

 

Now you have a gorgeous mini notebook!

 

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

It only took me about an hour to complete all three of these projects, and I just LOVE how they turned out!

 

 

Now I have little pieces of 2017’s fabulous calendar around my house!

I really enjoy upcycling in this manner, because I not only save myself some money, but I also feel like I’m contributing to saving the earth. What’s not to love about that?

What have YOU done with your old calendars? Please comment and give me some more ideas for what to do with the rest of my calendar!

 

Toodles Broads!

 

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***We want to know your opinion on anything you read in this article, so please COMMENT. All opinions are important, whether they are positive or negative. We want to hear from you!***

***This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!***

 



I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Where in the Bloody Hell Did Halloween Come From?

 

Tomorrow, people all over the nation and the world will disguise themselves and walk around their neighborhoods begging strangers for candy. Seems legit.

I was raised in a very religious household, and never celebrated Halloween growing up. It makes me wonder where this bizarre holiday and its traditions came from, and how it became what it is today.



I did some research, and I have to say, it was fascinating. I decided to be a doll and share the most interesting points in a post, in honor of the holiday. Happy Halloween!

 

Origins

Like most holidays, the origins of Halloween are rooted in pagan customs. It seems that Halloween began in Celtic Ireland some 2,000 years ago. Back then, it was not called Halloween, it was called Samhain, which means November, or summer’s end. The Celts had four major festivals each year, and Samhain was their autumn festival.

 

 

One thing that makes the Celtic calendar much different from ours is that the Celts believed that days and years began in darkness and transitioned into lightness.

This is why their new year began in the winter. It began in the darker months, and progressed lighter into spring and summer. So November 1 is the Celtic New Year. Celebrations began at sunset the night before, which is October 31.

The Celts were very cautious of transitions, believing that during these times the normal laws of the universe did not apply. The World Book Encyclopedia states: “The Celts believed that the dead could walk among the living…During Samhain, the living could visit with the dead.”

With November 1 marking the New Year, the Celts thought the transition between the old year and the New Year opened the boundaries of the “Otherworld.” Spirit creatures would be able to roam the earth freely during this transition.

 

Influences on Samhain

When the Romans conquered most of the Celtic lands, they began to bring some of their traditions into the mix. There are two major Roman festivals that were eventually incorporated into Samhain.

The first was the festival of Feralia, which was near the end of October. This festival honored the passing of the dead. The second was the festival to Pomona, the god of fruit and trees.

 

 

The apple was the symbol of Pomona. Interestingly, since the Irish festival of Samhain marked the end of the harvest, apples were already a big part of that. In fact, it was required that all of the apples had to be picked before the festivities of Samhain could begin on the night of October 31. So it made sense for the conquering Romans to elevate apples into the festival.

Despite Roman opposition, even after they were conquered, the Celts kept celebrating Samhain. In the 7th century, Pope Gregory III declared that November 1 would be All Saints Day, or all Hallows Day. Previously All Saints Day had been in May. This move was likely to merge Christian and pagan beliefs, thus converting more pagans to Christianity.

The evening before became All Hallows Eve, which eventually came to be called Halloween.

 

How Common Traditions Began

There are so many interesting traditions associated with Halloween, and let me tell you, their origins are not boring. I picked out four of the best (in my humble opinion) Halloween traditions, and found out how they began.

 

Costumes:

As I mentioned, it was believed by the Celts that spirit creatures could roam freely on Samhain. Some people even left their doors opened and placed food out for the spirits of their loved ones to welcome them home.

 

 

However, it was also thought that some of these spirits were looking for bodies to inhabit, or wanted to harm people they were angry at in their lives on earth.

To protect themselves, the Celts disguised themselves in various costumes, their version of demons, often incorporating animal heads. The purpose was to confuse the evil spirits, and trick them into thinking the humans were also demons. It was a defense mechanism to protect the living.

As time passed and Christianity began to exert more influence over the holiday, the Catholic Church encouraged dressing up as angels, saints, and other heavenly creatures. Eventually, it became acceptable to dress up as anything you wanted, as long as it was a disguise.

 

Jack O’ Lanterns:

I’ve always wondered why we carve strange faces into pumpkins in the days approaching October 31. Again, this tradition is rooted in Irish history.

 

 

The Celts had a myth about a man called Stingy Jack. He was a blacksmith and a drunk, and one night he ran into the Devil in a pub.

He invited the Devil for a drink. However, being “stingy,” he did not want to pay for his drink. He managed to convince the Devil to turn himself into a coin to pay for their drinks, in exchange for Jack’s soul.

 

 

However, when the Devil complied, Jack changed his mind and pocketed the coin. Jack had a silver cross in his pocket next to the coin, which prevented the Devil from freeing himself. He only agreed to set the Devil free on the promise that the Devil would leave him and his soul alone for 10 years. The Devil complied.

After the passing of 10 years, Jack again encountered the Devil, this time on a country road. The Devil was eager to claim what was owed to him. However, Jack ended up tricking the Devil again, convincing him to climb a tree to grab a luscious apple as a last meal for Jack to enjoy before having his soul claimed.

When the Devil did so, Jack quickly carved a cross into the trunk of the tree, trapping the Devil again. He made the Devil promise to never try to claim his soul again. Having no choice, the Devil again complied, and was freed by Jack.

The story doesn’t end there for Stingy Jack. When he died, God wanted nothing to do with the deceiver, and barred him from entering Heaven. To top it off, the Devil was pissed and didn’t want Jack in Hell either. Confused and distraught, Jack asked the Devil what he was supposed to do. The Devil told him to go back where he came from.

The way was very dark, so the Devil, in an undeserved act of decency, tossed Jack a piece of coal from hell. Jack placed the coal into a carved turnip to light his way.

 

Stingy Jack | How To Carve The Perfect Jack-O-Lantern [Infographic])

Image via Jovan-Ukropina Deviant Art

 

From then on, he was no longer called Stingy Jack. Instead, they called him Jack of the Lantern. It is said that he still roams the earth with his turnip lantern.

Tradition meant the Irish would carve creepy faces into turnips and place them in windows to scare away Stingy Jack and the other unsavory souls that roamed the earth on Samhain. Later, after the Irish immigrated to America, pumpkins became the more accepted vegetable for this purpose.

 

Bobbing for Apples:

While the apple has always had a large part in the origins of Halloween, the tradition of bobbing for apples actually came from Britain, and extended to Ireland. It was known as a courting ritual. The first young lady to bite an apple would be the first to marry, it was believed.

 

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org

 

The game was eventually all but forgotten, until Americans decided to incorporate it into modern Halloween festivities.

There was also a superstition that if a girl put her bitten apple under her pillow before she fell asleep, she would see her future husband in her dreams.

 

Trick or Treating:

There are differing opinions about the origins of trick or treating.

One theory asserts that it began in medieval times. Poor adults and their children would go door to door on All Hallows Eve and offer to say prayers and sing songs for the recently departed souls of that family. In exchange, the family would give food or beer to the poor family as a token of appreciation.

 

 

Another theory is that because All Hallows Eve became known for pranks, the term “Trick or Treat” was coined to offer kids an alternative to playing pranks, a sort of bribe. The here-are-some-treats-don’t-TP-my-yard-please kind of bribe.

Wherever trick or treating originated from, it became an integral part of Halloween festivities after the Great Depression. Children began going to homes dressed in costumes asking for candy, and it stuck.

 

Halloween Today

Today, Halloween is celebrated all over the world. Kids love to dress up and roam the neighborhoods filling bags or buckets with as much candy as they can. For adults, like many other American holidays, Halloween has become an excuse to gather, eat, drink, and party. We even dress up our animals!

 

 

This festival meant a lot people 2,000 years ago. It may not mean the same thing to us today, but Halloween is a great example of the way ancient festivals and traditions from different cultures have collided and morphed into modern day celebrations.

So when you celebrate tomorrow, stop for a moment to think about how humans have been taking part in similar festivals basically since the beginning of our species.

We continue to grow and change as time goes by, which begs the question: What will Halloween will look like 2,000 years in the future?

 

Be safe and have fun!

 

 

 

The information in this post was taken from several different resources, including:

Irishgeneologytoolkit.com

Albany.edu

JW.org

History.com

Hauntedbay.com

Smithsonianmag.com

 

**I love to hear from my readers. If you have a thought or opinion about something in this article, please comment! Let’s get a convo started!**

 

Like what you read? Subscribe to The Bonafide Broad to get this kind of exclusive content right in your inbox! Just click this link and enter your email addy!

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I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Cheers to REAL!

I love social media.

I love being able to see what my brother in Okinawa is up to. I love checking up on my mom, my sisters and my nephew, who live a few states away in Washington. My dad lives in Oregon, so I also like to keep tabs on how he is doing.

I have friends all over the country and world, and social media keeps us closely connected. It’s so nice to be able to hop on to Facebook or Instagram and see what everyone is doing today. I dig getting recipes, product recommendations, ideas and inspiration for decor, gift-giving, organizing, fashion, beauty and more. What’s not to love?

 


 

A lot, actually. As much as I love social media, I also equally hate it.

I can’t stand when people’s timelines consist of dozens and dozens of selfies, sprinkled with post updates like “Sooooo bored!”  It drives me nuts when I see a post directed at some mysterious person who is unnamed, with vague statements that nobody will understand.  If you aren’t going to explain who the hell you are talking to and what the hell you are talking about, don’t be surprised when nobody gives a crap.

I lose my mind when people post about politics or religion with a narrow world view, and no courtesy or respect for the opinions of others. I want to punch the people who call out anyone and everyone for the tiniest, most insignificant issues, just to make themselves feel bigger. Trolls. Bullies. Keyboard warriors. They hide behind a monitor because they aren’t brave enough to say what they believe in the actual presence of others.

But the thing I hate the ABSOLUTE MOST about social media is how perfect some people try to make their life look. I have never met anyone in person who is as happy and put together as their social media accounts claim. The sad thing is, even knowing that these profiles are not real, it’s easy to start feeling completely inadequate, self-conscious, and unkempt. Often I find myself wondering, as I scroll through my feeds, how the hell so many people seem get it right, when I struggle daily.

As a side point, I am guilty doing all of these things that drive me crazy. I’m as guilty as anyone else.

You know, it seems like the way many of us portray ourselves on social media is quite often the same way we portray ourselves on our resumes and in job interviews.

 

 

Best foot forward. Only the good. We are great, our lives are awesome, and we’ve got this adulting thing down.

 

Here’s the real deal: We all make numerous mistakes every single day.

Don’t get me wrong, sometimes life IS easy. Sometimes I actually meal prep for the week on Sunday. Sometimes I get up the first time my alarm goes off. There are some days my hair barely needs to be brushed because it looks THAT GOOD. But these anomalies are the exception, not the rule.

The rule is, life can really effing suck. There are days where  I forget to set my alarm entirely. Days where I realize halfway through work that I’m wearing two different colored flats. Days where I’m amazed that I am able to get myself out of bed, to the office, and back home again without committing a homicide.

It ain’t easy to put on my big girl panties every day and go out and change the world a little at a time. It’s necessary, but certainly not simple.

Sometimes I get so frustrated and beside myself that I just want to scream until no more scream will come out! Some days I do.

 

 

The crazy thing is, as much as the artificial nature of social media drives me batty, I don’t necessarily think it’s BAD that we do this with our profiles.  Maybe our profile is more of a representation of the person we ASPIRE to be, instead of what we actually ARE. There isn’t anything wrong with that, is there? It’s good for us to have goals, to work toward that perfect life.

I just wonder if most people realize that they’re profile isn’t an accurate representation of who they really are. If they don’t, then they likely aren’t actually trying to be like the person they want us all to think they are. Having a goal isn’t enough. If you aren’t working to achieve it, the goal is completely pointless.

I crave honesty and authenticity from others. Don’t get me wrong, I love seeing the best of people’s lives. But there is this whole other part that I want to see. Unfortunately, it usually remains hidden.

I want to know the hardships, the mistakes, the bad days of my fellow travelers in this thing called life. Not one of us has a perfect life. Isn’t it true that life is wrought with tough times, with wrong decisions and their repercussions, with days that, no matter how hard we try, things just won’t go right? Don’t we all sometimes feel like we are running and running and getting nowhere?

 

 

Why be ashamed? Why not share our crazy with others? Why not seek out the humor in our messed up existence? One thing I know to be true is when I see a glimpse of someone else’s imperfection, it makes me feel more adequate. It reminds me that it’s okay to suck sometimes. It reminds me that I’m real, and so is everyone else.

My goal for this blog is to write about REAL life, in all of its disheveled, confusing, sometimes dirty and unorganized glory. Lucky for me, my own life has so much REAL in it, I’ll most certainly never run out of things to write about.

This blog is a representation of my journey, the things I’ve learned, good or bad, the easy way or the hard way, in my imperfect life. I’ll write about cooking, decorating, losing (or gaining) weight, fashion, parenting, current events, how pissed I am at my guy. I’ll write about whatever the hell I want. You can join the journey and share your experiences along the way. Or you can navigate away from this webpage and never come back. Honestly, I don’t care, because I’m writing this for me, and for those who want to hear about REAL LIFE.

It’s my hope that sharing these things will create an atmosphere where people can feel comfortable in their own skin. Where we can help each other with our problems. Where we can get honest opinions about everything, whether it be political, spiritual, or even just about a product. Let’s just be real here people!

I’m proud to be a bonafide broad who mostly doesn’t get it right. And who knows, maybe sometimes I’ll accidentally achieve that close-to-perfect that we are all aspire toward. I wouldn’t count on it, though.

 

Cheers to REAL Broads!

 

 

**I love to hear from my readers. If you have a thought or opinion about something in this article, please comment! Let’s get a convo started!**

 

Like what you read? Subscribe to The Bonafide Broad to get this kind of exclusive content right in your inbox! Just click this link and enter your email addy!

Do your friends and family a solid and share this post so they can benefit from it, too! Just click the appropriate button below to share it to your preferred social media platform. Thank you for supporting The Bonafide Broad!

 



I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.