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In My Belly in 30: Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle (Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe)

In My Belly in 30: Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle (Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe)

I have a serious addiction to popcorn. Not just any popcorn. Chocolate drizzled popcorn. Oh lawd, nothing makes me happier than munching on a fresh batch of drizzled popcorn!

My addiction began last July, right after we moved to Flagstaff. Mr. OG and I were super excited because Flagstaff has a Sam’s Club, which neither of us had ever been to. So we went to check it out, and I ended up purchasing a nice big family-sized bag of Popcorn Indiana Black and White Drizzlecorn.

 



I sampled it after we got home, and then proceeded to eat half the bag in one sitting. By the next day, it was long gone. I couldn’t believe the party in my mouth! So, the next time we went to Sam’s Club, I got two bags, which lasted two days in our house.

Then I started craving the stuff. Like big time, ALL the time. So I thought I’d better stock up. We headed to Sam’s Club, and I went straight to my Popcorn Indiana end cap. To my absolute HORROR, it was full of tortilla chips! I frantically searched the snack aisles, and then desperately consulted a store associate. He explained that they ended their contract with Popcorn Indiana and no longer carry the drizzlecorn. Broken-hearted, I sulked home.

I just couldn’t live like that, so I began online research. I could NOT BELIEVE that my lovely bags of popcorn I was paying five bucks and change for at Sam’s Club were $15 + on Amazon. The best deal I could find was ten smaller-sized bags for $40. So yeah, I bought them. And ate my ten small bags in five days.

 



I knew Mr. OG was not going to let that continue. He asked me if any other popcorn would work. Smart Food? Moose Munch? “NO!” I replied. “It has to be Popcorn Indiana!”

You see, no other chocolate popcorn, or flavored popcorn, is quite like theirs. They have this wonderful sort of crunchy sugar coating on the outside of the popcorn, and then they drizzle it with dark chocolate and white chocolate. It’s HEAVEN. And nobody else makes it that way.

So I set out to create the perfect copycat. Do you know what happened? I made it BETTER. Now I won’t buy Popcorn Indiana’s Drizzlecorn, because my homemade stuff takes less than half an hour to make,  and is freaking delicious!

I can’t stop. I make a batch at least every other day. It just hits all of my taste buds in all the right ways. It’s sweet and salty, crunchy and melty, and the most perfect snack I’ve ever encountered. There’s no doubt I’m completely addicted. And I’m gonna be a doll and share the recipe with you. But I warn you, you may become addicted, too.

 

Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle

Ingredients:

 

Vanilla Kettle Corn with Double Chocolate Drizzle-Popcorn Indiana Copycat Recipe

 

1 bag butter popcorn

2 Tablespoons butter

1/2 teaspoon salt (I like pink Himalayan)

2 Tablespoons water

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/3 cup milk chocolate chips

1/3 cup white chocolate chips

 

***Side point*** If you can get some of this stuff, do it:

 

You’re popcorn will turn out just fine with regular vanilla, but this Madagascar vanilla really kicks up the flavor and makes it all that much more AMAZING! If you can’t find it at your local grocery store, get it here.

Instructions:

Put small saucepan over medium-low heat. Add butter, salt, water, vanilla, and sugar, and let heat to simmer, stirring occasionally.

 

 

 

While it’s heating, pop your popcorn.

 

 

Also, measure out your chocolate chips into two small bowls.

 

 

Your butter mixture only needs to heat for about five minutes. It should look like this:

 

 

When it does (like I said, about five minutes) turn off the heat.

Dump your popcorn into a large bowl.

 

 

Drizzle the butter mixture over the popcorn, 1/3 at a time, tossing the popcorn thoroughly with tongs between each third.

 

 

When the popcorn is completely covered in the butter mixture, spread it out evenly on a foil lined cookie sheet.

Microwave each bowl of chocolate separately, until melted. I do the milk chocolate first, because it looks better on the popcorn to have the milk chocolate between the white popcorn and the white chocolate. It really makes the white chocolate drizzle stand out. I also microwave each bowl for 30 seconds, stir thoroughly, and then pop it back in for another 30 seconds.

 

 

Using the milk chocolate first, drizzle the whole bowl over the popcorn, careful to do so as evenly as possible. Follow with the white chocolate.

 

 

Put popcorn into fridge for about 10 minutes to harden chocolate.

 

 

When chocolate is set, which happens very quickly, use a spatula to break it up. Put the into ziplocks bags.

 

 

I divide mine in half between two half-gallon zip locks.

 

 

That’s all there is to it! Except to enjoy!

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I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Tutorial: 3 Easy Ways to Upcycle Last Year’s Calendar

Hello my broads! Have you put up your new calendars yet? I received a fantastic calendar as a Christmas gift from a coworker this year called “Nuns Having Fun.” It’s all pictures of nuns bowling, bicycling, sailing, etc. I love it! You can buy it here.

 



I SO loved last year’s calendar, though. It was a beautifully illustrated work of art, called “The Lang 2017 Love to Cook Calendar,” with paintings of fat chefs creating amazing concoctions on nice thick paper. It broke my heart to take it down, and I just couldn’t throw it away.

So I started to think, how can I use this expired beauty? Broads, you’re in for treat!

Today I’m going to show you three fabulous ways you can upcycle last year’s calendar. I promise, you will be so excited, you’ll start collecting everyone else’s old calendars, too. You’ll also realize these three projects are just the beginning, and I bet while you are making these, your brain will be coming up with a ton of other ways you can use your old calendars!

Let’s get started on project numero uno!

 

 

Project 1: Pen/Pencil/Paintbrush Holders:

For this first simple project, you’ll need your calendar, four empty tin cans, a ruler, glue, a Sharpee, and scissors (not pictured).

 

 

The first thing you want to do is measure your can to see how wide you need to cut your paper. Make sure you measure only the flat part that the paper will be glued to, and not the lip of the can. Mine were about 4 inches.

 

 

Next, you need to find four pictures or areas of a picture that you like. Measure the four inch width and mark it across your paper with the Sharpee.

 

 

Then use the ruler to connect the marks and make a straight line. Take your scissors and cut along the line. That should give you a nice four inch wide strip of paper. Repeat the process with your other three papers.

 

 

You’ll end up with four strips of four inch wide paper, like so:

 

 

Now grab a can. squeeze a line of glue vertically down the can.

 

 

Take a strip of your paper. Starting at the glue line, wrap the paper around your can. You’ll want to make a new glue line about every 1 1/2 to 2 inches to make sure your paper is nice and sealed to the can. When you get to the end, cut off the excess paper.

 

 

Then you can draw a line of glue at the very end to seal the edge of the paper flat, like this:

 

 

Make sure you press it firmly and hold it for a few seconds so it stays flat and doesn’t raise on the edges. Repeat the gluing process with your other three cans and papers. Before you know it, viola! You have gorgeous holders for your art utensils!

 

 

I took my project a step further and you may be able to as well, depending on what you have laying around your home. I had a drink caddy with four glasses and a jug that I never use. I took the glasses and jug out, and put my cans in, which created an awesome little art utensil caddy. So cute!

 

 

That’s project one, and it was easy as pie!

 

 

Project 2: Bookmarks

For this project you’ll need your calendar, a paper cutter, glue, a Sharpee (not pictured), a hole punch, some ribbon, a ruler, and a piece of sturdy cardboard.

 

 

The first thing you want to do is measure and mark the width of your bookmark on the cardboard. I’m doing 1 1/2 inches.

 

 

Connect your dots and use the ruler to draw a straight line for cutting.

 

 

Use the paper cutter to ensure very straight lines, like so:

 

 

Next, you’ll want to cut your calendar paper about two and a half times as wide as your cardboard piece, and about and inch longer. So for instance, my book mark is 1 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches long. So I’m going to cut my calendar paper 3 3/4 (1 1/2 X 2.5) inches wide and 6 (5 1) inches long.

 

 

Put your cardboard piece on top of your freshly cut calendar paper. Now get your glue and line both short ends of your cardboard with glue.

 

 

Next, fold the ends of the calendar paper over the cardboard, and press them hard to get the glue to seal them.

 

 

You’ll now line one of the long sides of the cardboard with glue, and fold the paper over, pressing hard again to get a nice firm seal.

 

 

Put a line of glue across the middle of your bookmark, like so:

 

 

Then simply fold the last end over so your cardboard is completely wrapped in the calendar paper. You’ll also want to put an extra line of glue on the short ends, and press nice and hard so they seal better, like this:

 

 

At this point, put your bookmark(s) under a book or something else flat and heavy. This will allow for flat drying. It’ll take about 30 to 60 minutes to get dry enough. I did two bookmarks. You can do however many you want.

 

 

After drying, punch a hole in one end, centered.

 

 

Take your ribbon and cut it to the length you want. I did about 8 inches, giving myself a little extra to work with.

 

 

Thread your ribbon through the hole punch and tie it securely. Trim if necessary.

 

 

There you have it! Lovely bookmarks!

 

 

These were super simple, and since I’m always in need of bookmarks for my cookbooks, they were put to use right away!

 

 

 

Project 3: Mini Pocket Notebook

Our last project is a simply adorable mini pocket notebook. You will need your old calendar, a paper cutter, a Sharpee (not pictured), glue, a hole punch, a ruler, computer paper, and twine.

 

 

First things first, you want to measure how wide your paper will be. Think of how wide you want your notebook and then double it, because you will be folding your paper in half.

I actually cut out a few pieces and folded them to give myself a good idea of exact widths and lengths. I settled on 5 inches, so I will have 2 1/2 inch wide paper in my mini notebook.

 

 

Use the paper cutter to cut your paper to the length you measured. See how I put my paper at the 5 inch mark?

 

 

Your calendar paper will be the outside cover of the notebook. I wanted mine 1/4 inch bigger on all sides than my white paper. So that would be 8 3/4 inches long (because my paper was the standard 8 1/2 by 11), and 5 1/4 inches wide. Follow the same process of measuring, drawing your lines, and using the paper cutter to get everything nice and straight.

 

Now, fold your white papers in half, and use your hole punch to make two holes. They will be on the folded side, about 1/8 to 1/4 inch from the edges. Since I didn’t get a good photo, I drew up a quick diagram to show you what I mean. The two circles are approximately where you want your holes punched.

Make sure you punch the holes while the papers are folded in half, so when you unfold them you will have four holes all together.  You will need to punch two holes into your cover paper (old calendar) as well, in the exact same spot as the white paper, so they will line up perfectly.

 

 

Next, measure out two pieces of twine.  I did mine at 12 inches, because I wasn’t sure how much I would need. If you plan on just tying a secure double knot, you probably only need each string to be about 4 inches long. But if you want to try a cute bow, 12 inches is a good amount to work with. You can always trim them down later.

 

 

Now put your white paper and your cover paper together, lining up the holes. Thread the twine through the holes and tie, making sure it’s very secure. I settled on a double knot because I’m terrible at tying secure bows.

 

 

It should look something like this:

 

 

You can stop at this point if you want, and have a wonderful mini notebook. However, I like to do one last step because I think it makes my mini notebook a bit more professional and polished. What I do is glue the very first white page and the very last white page to the cover page, like this:

 

 

Now you have a gorgeous mini notebook!

 

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

It only took me about an hour to complete all three of these projects, and I just LOVE how they turned out!

 

 

Now I have little pieces of 2017’s fabulous calendar around my house!

I really enjoy upcycling in this manner, because I not only save myself some money, but I also feel like I’m contributing to saving the earth. What’s not to love about that?

What have YOU done with your old calendars? Please comment and give me some more ideas for what to do with the rest of my calendar!

 

Toodles Broads!

 

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***We want to know your opinion on anything you read in this article, so please COMMENT. All opinions are important, whether they are positive or negative. We want to hear from you!***

***This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!***

 



I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Make It Yourself: Grammy’s Winter Bread

Make It Yourself: Grammy’s Winter Bread

As the cold of winter sets in in the Pacific Northwest, us Washingtonians are hunkering down for the rain-filled season of gloom and grey. With the weather, comes my inevitable craving for good, old fashioned vittles.  For our cozy crew, this means herb crusted pork roasts and mashed potatoes, Dutch ovens full of piping hot soup, mulled wine by the gallon, and one of my (new) favorites… warm, crusty, buttered bread.

Now, I have to come clean on this one… the majority of the cuisine that comes out of my kitchen has been perfected over the course of many moons, but this crusty little baby is the first loaf of bread that I have ever made… EVER.  I used a recipe that I found in the depths of my grandmother’s kitchen.  It was written on a napkin and was hidden deep inside a recipe box that has been in the “baking cupboard” for decades and let me tell you what… there’s a reason why it was in that box.  Creating this little loaf of pillowey sunshine is nearly as easy as boiling water and the end result is delicious!

To start, gather up your ingredients grab your stand mixer and your dough hook, or a good ol’ fashioned bowl and spoon, and get ready for to partake in the easiest recipe you have ever made!

 

 

In your bowl, add three cups of regular All-Purpose flour (or APF as I like to call it), one teaspoon of salt, one half teaspoon of your active dry yeast and one and a half cups of warm water.

 

 

Now that you have all of your ingredients together, it’s time to get-a-mixin’!

 

 

If you’re using a stand-mixer, start her on low (this will keep the flour in the bowl and not all over your kitchen counters) and gradually increase the speed until all of the ingredients have come together in a nice pillowey ball and the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl.  Same goes for the old spoon and strength method.  Once the ingredients are combined and the dough pulls away from the sides, you’re ready to go!

 

 

And here’s the hard part… the wait.

After your dough has come together, just leave it in your bowl, cover it with plastic and find a nice cozy spot for it to proof.  The dough needs to rise for eight to twenty hours.  This may seem like an obscene amount of time, (I was shooketh when I read those numbers) but I promise you, the wait is COMPLETELY worth it.

 

 

I decided to make my dough at around 11 PM and let that baby rise until I came home from work the following afternoon around 6PM… so it sat for just under 20 hours.  I did make a few more loaves and proofed (the fancy term for letting your dough rise) them for different amounts of time within the criteria and they all turned out great!

Here’s what it looked like after proofing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

After my dough had proofed, I floured my countertops with a whole crap-ton of APF.  (This dough is extremely sticky and the liberal flouring really helps with cleanup.)  I used a sifter for even distribution, but regular old sprinkling works perfectly!

 

 

Once floured, I rolled and pulled and scraped my dough out of my mixing bowl and onto the floury countertop.

 

 

I de-ringed and dunked my hands in some flour and gave that baby a flip, tuck and roll.

 

 

You don’t want to overwork your dough so once it’s formed into a nice little button, give your hands a rinse and let that baby rise.

 

 

Thirty minutes is all it takes and while your dough is proofing again, you can start to prep your oven.

Crank it up to 450 degrees and get your Dutch oven (D.O), lid and all, in there to get nice and toasty while the oven preheats. If you don’t have a D.O., you can use any baking dish as long as it has high sides and a lid, but the cast iron really helps create that beautiful crust on the bottom of the loaf.

 

 

After the thirty minutes has elapsed and your oven and D.O. baking dish are both nice and hot, carefully slice an “X” into the top of your pillowey ball of dough and transfer it into the D.O. dish.

 

 

Pop that lid back on and get in the oven. Set your timer for 30 minutes and start to plan all of the delicious things you are going to do with your loaf once it’s done!

 

 

After thirty minutes has elapsed, remove the lid and admire your almost-finished product.

 

 

It was at this point in the breading process that I had to freak out a little… I couldn’t believe that I created something that looked so pretty and that smelled so good!  (Seriously, your house is going to smell like a bakery)

After having a quick peek at your loaf, toss that lid into the sink (remember, it’s HOT!) and get that bread back into the oven.  Your loaf needs another ten to fifteen minutes uncovered to brown that crust up and you’re in the home stretch!

 

 

It is now time to remove your D.O. from the oven and transfer your gorgeous loaf of bread onto a wire rack to cool.

 

 

You are going to be tempted to immediately slice and devour the fruits of your patience but the bread slices MUCH easier after it has had the chance to cool for a few minutes.

 

 

This loaf sat on the counter for about half an hour before I grabbed the serrated knife and got to slicing.

 

 

Mr. Pizza Arm approves!

 

 

 

Bon Appetit!

 

 

 

We love to hear from our readers. If you have a thought or opinion about something in this article, please comment! Let’s get a convo started!

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I’m a PNW girl from the top of my head straight down to the tips of my toes. I was born and raised and currently live in the gorgeous upper left with my railroading husband and our cat Dean. I am a full-time executive, part-time student, and find myself spending the majority of my free time in the beanery (aka kitchen) baking, sauteing, roasting, boiling, broiling and most importantly, EATING! I am honored to be a guest of Amber, The OG, and can’t wait to share more of myself, my recipes and my tips on life with all of you wonderful Broads!

In My Belly in 30: Zippy ChickParm (Chicken Parmesan)

In My Belly in 30: Zippy ChickParm (Chicken Parmesan)

I love chicken parmesan. And as  you’ve probably noticed, I’m  not one of those people that has time to be completely organic, Paleo, gluten-free, etc. Sometimes, I barely have time to sit down to eat at all. That’s real life for me. Maybe your life looks different. Nothing wrong with that. So I’ve been in need of a quick and yummy chicken parmesan recipe.

In fact, I’m always looking for recipes that are delicious, easy, quick, and not completely horrible for my health.

 



 

When I find one, I add it to my monthly rotation, and I share it with everyone!

Hence, the idea for In My Belly in 30. In order for a recipe to qualify for this series, it has to be able to be cooked in 30 minutes or less, be uncomplicated, and fairly inexpensive, and not horribly unhealthy. Most importantly, it has to be delish!

 

The Dish

The first recipe I’ll share in the In My Belly In 30 series is my Zippy ChickParm. This is a super yummy and easy-to-follow recipe that is sure to please anyone you make it for.

 

So, first things first, we need wine. Today our selection comes from the Provence of the Target Clearance section. It was a whopping $2.99!

 

Get your priorities straight and start with a glass of wine

 

I almost always pour myself a glass of wine before I begin cooking because I am an adult and I can drink wine when I cook if I want to. I also feel like it gets my creative juices flowing. And I tend to pour a splash of wine into almost everything I make. Yea, sometimes my life is awesome!

Now that we have wine in hand, let’s do this!

 

 

Zippy ChickParm

Ingredients:

3 or 4 frozen breaded chicken breasts/tenderloins

24 ounce jar of marinara sauce

2 cups finely shredded mozzarella

1/4 cup finely shredded Parmesan

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon parsley

1 teaspoon white sugar

 

Ingredients for Zippy ChickParm

 

 

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees:

 

Oven to 425 ° F

 

Spray an 8 by 8 inch glass pan with nonstick coating:

 

8 X 8 glass baking pan

 

3. Pour about 1/4 cup (guessing is fine, exact measurements are unnecessary) of marinara sauce into the 8 X 8 inch pan. Spread evenly with rubber spatula to coat whole bottom of pan:

 

 

 

Gather garlic powder, onion powder, parsley, and sugar (yea, I use cheap spices, what you gonna do about it??):

 

 

 

Measure each spice right into the jar with remaining marinara sauce:

 

 

 

Put the lid on the jar and shake very well, about two minutes, to thoroughly mix the spices into the sauce:

 

 

 

Side point: The sugar is important, so don’t skip it. It cuts the acidity from the tomatoes. I always put a teaspoon of sugar in red sauces.

Ok, back to the recipe. Next, place three or four frozen breaded chicken breasts or tenderloins into sauced pan arranging evenly.  I use Tyson brand, which you can get a big bag of at Sam’s Club or Costco. I only use three, because there’s only two of us eating during the week (so that leaves an extra for Mr. OG’s lunch the next day), but four will fit fine:

 

 

 

Pour spiced marinara sauce over chicken breasts:

 

 

 

Spread sauce evenly:

 

 

 

Sprinkle about 1 1/2 cups of mozzarella cheese over sauce. Then sprinkle the 1/4 cup of Parmesan cheese over the mozzarella. Sprinkle remaining mozzarella over top of Parmesan. Splitting the cheese this way makes sure the Parm doesn’t get really hard on top, and both cheeses melt evenly:

 

 

 

Place dish on center rack of preheated oven:

 

 

 

 

Set timer for 25 minutes:

 

 

At this point, I like to make sure and pour myself a second glass of wine, because it take a lot of sips to get through food prep.

While the timer is going, make your sides. I like to keep it simple. I usually boil some thin spaghetti noodles (use any kind of noodle you like), and simmer some canned or fresh green beans in butter, salt and pepper. Texas toast or garlic bread is a yummy side, too.

After 25 minutes, your ChickParm should look like this:

 

 

 

Yummers!! Serve over the noodles!

 

 

 

There’s your gorgeous Zippy ChickParm! Don’t forget to pour yourself another glass of wine before digging in!

Like I promised, if you followed the instructions correctly, you will have a yummy hot meal in 30 minutes from start to finish! Also, you will likely be a little bit tipsy. What’s bad about that?

Bon Appetit!!

 

 

**I love to hear from my readers. If you have a thought or opinion about something in this article, please comment! Let’s get a convo started!**

 

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Do your friends and family a solid and share this post so they can benefit from it, too! Just click the appropriate button below to share it to your preferred social media platform. Thank you for supporting The Bonafide Broad!

 

 



I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.