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Bring It Like a Broad: Bitty-Broad Isis Brown Faces Her Bullies

Bring It Like a Broad: Bitty-Broad Isis Brown Faces Her Bullies

Today is one of my favorite days of the month! That’s because it’s the day we publish our monthly series, Bring It Like a Broad!  I love it because it’s a chance to celebrate females, and all we are capable of .

Remember, the purpose of this series is to highlight real ladies who are doing or have done the extraordinary. Our goal in celebrating these special people and their accomplishments is that each of us will be encouraged to believe in the possibility of our own goals and dreams. We also hope that seeing these women changing the world will blaze paths for all the little girls out there who will grow up someday and want to join their ranks.

 



This month’s Broad is actually one of those little girls. We’ll call her a Bitty-Broad. In fact, when the following events unfolded, she was only in 7th grade! Which just goes to show, we can learn things from our kids every day. Sometimes they display wisdom and courage far beyond their years, as did our Bitty-Broad.

 

THE BROAD

Imagine being named after an Egyptian goddess. Now imagine that goddess represents magic and healing, and was one of the most important deities in Ancient Egypt. Pretty cool stuff, no?

That’s how our Bitty-Broad, 14-year-old Isis Brown felt. In fact, people would often tell her how beautiful and unique her name was. She was proud of her name.

 

Statue of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis.

Statue of the goddess Isis, courtesy of http://www.resurrectisis.org/

 

Then, around 2013, her name became famous. Unfortunately, as I’m sure you know, it wasn’t the kind of “famous” a 7th grader, or anyone, wants. The news outlets began extensive coverage of a terrorist group called the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. If there’s one thing the media loves, it’s nicknames. So the term ISIS became a household name.

Little Isis Brown from Oklahoma was suddenly thrust into the spotlight at school. People no longer complimented her on her unique name. Instead, they called her a terrorist. They accused her of killing Americans, saying they saw her on the news. She could hear the kids whispering behind her back, calling her a killer and anti-American.

It began to have a detrimental effect on Isis. She started avoiding certain classes, hiding out in places where she wouldn’t be bullied. She would often come home from school crying.

 

Isis Brown, the brave 14-year-old who faced her bullies head on.

Photo courtesy of www.news5cleveland.com

 

But it didn’t just affect her school life. Kids took to Facebook to make fun of Isis. The bullying even began to destroy one of her favorite hobbies, deejaying. Many gigs she had lined up dropped her because of her name. Music was one of the biggest parts of her life. Can you imagine having so much of your life turned upside down, just because of your name? Now imagine that happening to you at 14-years-old. It would almost be impossible to bear.

Finally, our Bitty-Broad reached her limit. She could not go on letting these kids bully her, without sticking up for herself. Isis didn’t go to her principle privately, or ask her parents to intervene. No, she was even more courageous than that. She took to Facebook and created a video to address her tormentors.

In the video, she encouraged other people who share her name to be strong, remember what their name means, and not cower or avoid places where bullies will be. “No, you be the bigger person and show you’re not putting up with this anymore.” she stated. “That you can fight this battle, that you’re not going to let some wannabe bullies pick on you.”

She concluded the video by saying, “So you kids out there with the name Isis, “Love your name, cherish your name. I’m still learning – and I know you guys are too – but, in all reality, you’re named after a goddess. You’re not named after the terrorist group.”

Do you know what happened? The kids at school apologized! They now describe her as being brave and strong.

 

FINAL THOUGHTS

There are a few things I really love about our Bitty-Broad’s experience.

First, it is incredible to see such a young girl gather the amount of courage Isis did, and face her fears. Remember, courage is not lack of fear. Courage is taking action despite being afraid.

Second, Isis went through three years of torment before she made this video. Sometimes, it takes us a while to get up the gumption to defend ourselves, and that’s okay.

Third, you don’t have to save the lives of thousands of people, or become the CEO of a huge company to be considered brave. Sometimes, a little girl in Oklahoma can show just as much courage as anyone else. In fact, when you show courage in the small things in life, it helps you to stand tall in the bigger things.

Lastly, you never know who you can learn a life lesson from. It’s not always the old experienced people that have profound wisdom. Sometimes we can learn as much from the bravery of one little girl, as we can from volumes of historical figures that changed the world.

Isis Brown is one of my personal heroes. She has taught me that your voice, no matter how small, can influence and help others. She also reminds me that your name isn’t who you are. No, it’s the way you live your life that defines your true character.

 

 ***Watch Isis Brown’s video response to her bullies here.***

 

Is there a woman you know personally who inspires you and others in some way? Is there a woman from history that you look up to? There are no guidelines–if a woman is inspiring to you in ANY way, it counts!

Please email me if you have a lady you want to see featured in Bring It Like a Broad.

You can also email me with any questions or comments you may have: theog@thebonafidebroad.com.

 

Be brave!

***If you like this post, PLEASE share it on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, StumbleUpon, or wherever the hell you want!!!***

***We want to know your opinion on anything you read in this article, so please COMMENT. All opinions are important, whether they are positive or negative. We want to hear from you!***

***This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!***



 

I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.

Musings from the Maestro: Music | Are You Really Listening?

Hello Broads!

I’m so pleased to introduce a new series on The Bonafide Broad blog! It’s called Musings from the Maestro. We have a fantastic new contributor, The Maestro, who loves all things music. His (yes, our first male contributor!) name in the real world is Ryan, and he has volunteered to share some his introspection with us.He will pop in with his musings every once in a while. We hope to share thoughts from The Maestro on all things music, including influential artists, historical styles, lyrics and their meanings, reviews of music-related products, and more. I can’t wait to see where this goes! Hope you enjoy!

 



Here is The Maestro’s introductory post:

 

Music | Are You REALLY Listening?

For centuries, all around the world, music has been the inspiring, uplifting, creative, consoling, angering, endearing, driving art form for many walks of life. From the long flowing strings of Mozart, to the short plucking strings of bluegrass, and from the twangy sounds of country to the upbeat foot tapping tones of pop, there is something for everyone to enjoy or be entertained by (whether they know it or not).

 

Man relaxing and listening to music on a stereo.

 

Music is powerful. It moves people, not just physically, but emotionally and intellectually. Whether you’re a head bobber, a sing along-er, a foot tapper, a dancer, or just a listener, you can find yourself hypnotized by the instrumentals or lyrics of your favorite artists or bands.

I often say that there is a difference between hearing and listening. I learned that from my mom. When I was younger, she would ask me to repeat what she just said to me, and usually all I could say was “Uh, I wasn’t listening.” Taking this little lesson and applying it to other aspects of my life has helped me to communicate better with people and understand things that are often overlooked.

 

Abstract Music

 

I really noticed my mother’s lesson in action when I listened to music; it gave me a whole new outlook and appreciation for the art form. These days people are moving so fast, overlooking the details and just accepting the short version of things. People don’t often take the time to stop and really listen. This is one of my fears, and a place I don’t want society going.

When we first become young adults, we start to realize how fast life goes by. What we don’t realize until we are nearing the end of our life journey, is that we maybe didn’t grasp or experience as many emotions, knowledge, or moments as we could have. These are often regrets, or missed opportunities, and we all have them. That’s why I want people to slow down and take interest and pride in the minute details of everyday life. A great place to start practicing this is with music.

 

Sheet music with headphones

 

Attention to detail is a rare attribute, but it’s one of the most important ones you can have. Being attentive towards all aspects of what goes into making music, especially from a producing and listening standpoint, has really been a saving grace for me.

I have encountered many miseries and obstacles in my life, just as we all have. I know I will continue to experience these kinds of things. In the past, I found myself struggling to deal with my thoughts and emotions. So I began looking for outlets and places to turn for relief. Sports were the most helpful for me, but I noticed that they only really helped when I was on the field or the court. At this point in my life, I didn’t want to vent or talk to anyone about my problems. This was because I had developed a horrible habit of demanding dominance over my emotions and not allowing them flow freely.

 

Vintage record player

 

But then I encountered an artist whose music changed my life, healed my emotional wounds, and made me fall in love with the beauty of creativity and self expression. Since then, I have been obsessed with the making of and listening to music. I am still constantly learning all I can about music today.

I want you to ask yourself: are you REALLY listening to music, or just simply hearing it? This is so important, because the difference can change your life. I’m not an expert and I certainly don’t know everything, but I want to open a door that can help others find a true passion and appreciation for music, just as I have. My hope is that we can spread the love of music. I’m optimistic that if we all work together, we can bring back the days of really listening to music, and not just simply hearing.

 

No music, no life--Neon Sign

 

So here’s to opening our minds and our hearts, not just our ears!

 

If you like this post, PLEASE share it on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, or wherever the hell you want!!!

We want to know your opinion on anything you read in this article, so please COMMENT. All opinions are important, whether they are positive or negative. We want to hear from you!

This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!



I am a 22-year-old guy, born and raised in Flagstaff, AZ. Some of my favorite things are sports, music, good beer and better company. I bring home the bacon by working for the Flagstaff Unified School District. My free time is spent with my family and close friends, sometimes coaching high school football, and, of course, watching sports.

Bring It Like a Broad: Irena Sendler Saves 2,500 Children During the Holocaust

It’s that time of the month again! The time where we celebrate women, and all we are capable of . Yep, it’s time for Bring It Like a Broad!

Remember, the purpose of this series is to highlight real women who are doing or have done the extraordinary. Our goal in celebrating these special people and their accomplishments is that each of us will be encouraged to believe in the possibility of our own goals and dreams. We also hope that seeing these women changing the world will blaze paths for all the little girls out there who will grow up someday and want to join their ranks.

 



The first two installments of this series were interviews with women I know personally, who have majorly inspired me. Today, we are going to honor a woman from the past who made an enormous impact on the lives of those around her.

 

THE BROAD

Most of us have heard of Oskar Schindler, a German industrialist who saved the lives of 1,200 Jewish people during the Holocaust. He has been the subject of books and movies, and is a person who is incredibly inspiring for his courage and bravery. But he is not the only person who risked his life to save others during the Holocaust.

Meet our February Broad, Irena Sendler.

 

Irena in 2005, photo courtesy of irenasendler.org

She was a Polish woman born on February 15, 1910 near the Warsaw ghetto. Today would be her 108th birthday, so it’s fitting she be recognized as our bad ass broad this month.

Irena’s father had a great influence on her throughout her whole life. He was one of the first Polish Socialists, and was a doctor, whose patients were mostly poor Jews.

During World War II, the Warsaw ghetto was the largest Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Europe. Irena was a Senior Administrator of the Warsaw Social Welfare Department. This organization provided food, money, and other services to the elderly, to orphans and to the poor and homeless. She was the equivalent of a social worker today.

 

Photo found by Teresa Prekerowa, courtesy of Wikipedia

 

When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Irena began to use her position as a social worker to aid the Jews. In November of 1940, the Warsaw ghetto was sealed off. Almost 400,000 people had been driven into the extremely small area, only about 16 blocks. Conditions were horrible. Good hygiene was impossible, there was no food or medical supplies, and there was no space. Soon, disease became rampant, as well as death.

Because she was an employee of the Social Welfare Department, she was given a special permit which allowed her to enter areas of the ghetto where the Jewish people were. She was supposed to be checking for signs of diseases like typhus, because the Germans were paranoid about the diseases spreading beyond the ghetto.

She began sneaking clothing, money, and medicine in to the Jewish people. She would report the Jewish families she was helping as having highly infectious diseases, in order to prevent the Germans from coming to inspect.

Irena joined a secret group called Zegota (the Council to Aid Jews) in 1942. This group was organized by the Polish underground resistance, and Irena was one of it’s first recruits. She became an integral part of the organization, and a huge reason they were able to accomplish so much. They created over 3,000 false documents to help Jewish families. In 1943, she was nominated to head Zegota’s Jewish children’s section.

Irena and her coworkers began to smuggle infants and toddlers out of the Warsaw ghetto, saving them from being sent to concentration camps. They got very creative in the ways they would sneak the children out. Sometimes they would use ambulances, but more often they had to hide the children in suitcases and packages.

 

Children in Warsaw ghetto, photo courtesy of iwka.wordpress.com

 

Remember, it was no light slap on the wrist if you were caught helping the Jews in World War II. In fact, it was a huge risk, punishable by death. To make things worse, the Nazis wouldn’t just kill the person aiding the Jews, but also that person’s whole family, and sometimes even their close friends or acquaintances. She risked her life every single day, and she had to be very strategic in order to protect those close to her as well.

Once the children were hidden and smuggled out, they would be placed with either Polish Christian families, or into orphanages and convents. The children were protected further by being given false names. They were also taught to recite Christian prayers, just in case they were ever tested by Nazis.

Irena and her helpers were very careful to make sure the children didn’t lose their Jewish identities. They kept detailed documents listing the children’s real names, fake names, and locations. Of course, they couldn’t risk those documents being found, so they would hide them in jars and bury them. Irena was determined to get each child back to their family after the war was over, if at all possible.

Sadly, the Germans eventually caught on to what Irena was doing. In 1943 she was arrested and her home was ransacked. During this event, Irena was able to toss the lists of children to her friend, who hid them in her loose clothing. Her friend was never searched, thus keeping the children safe.

Irena was brutally tortured and beaten horribly. The Nazis fractured her feet and her legs, among other things. But Irena was courageous, and never betrayed any of the children or her coworkers. She was sentenced to death by firing squad.

 

Pawaik Prison, where the Nazis held Irena, photo courtesy of irenasendler.org

 

Fortunately, on the way to her execution, members of Zegota were able to bribe some of the greedy Germans into letting her go. She immediately went in to hiding.

You would think that would be enough for her, but it wasn’t. Irena had a determination and drive that isn’t seen a lot in this world. She returned to Warsaw with a fake identity, and began working with the Zegota organization again, continuing to help and hide Jews. She also worked as a nurse.

 

Photograph by Anna Mieszkowska, courtesy of Wikipedia

 

When the war ended, Irena and her coworkers turned the children’s records over to one of their colleagues who attempted to find the children and return them to their parents. Sadly, almost all of the parents had either gone missing, or had been killed in concentration camps. That goes to show that if it weren’t for Irena, most of those children would have been murdered, too.

It’s a travesty that Irena’s accomplishments went virtually unnoticed for decades. In fact, it wasn’t until 2000, when four students at Uniontown High School in Kansas won the Kansas State National History Day Competition, that Irena’s story became mainstream. They won by writing a play about Irena’s accomplishments, called Life in a Jar. It brought the spotlight to Irena and all she had done. The world finally took notice!

Irena lived a long and meaningful life after the war, still staying involved in activism. She passed away in May of 2008.

 

FINAL THOUGHTS

By the end of the Holocaust, six million Jews had been removed from this earth. The absolute horror of the atrocities that took place during that time are indescribable. Before the war, there were 9 million Jews in the 21 European countries that would eventually be overrun by the Germans. By the end of the war, two out of every three of those Jews had been killed. 1.2 million Jewish children were murdered. That doesn’t account for the thousands of children who were left disabled, missing body parts, and without families.

 

Irena with some of the children she saved, photo by Mariusz Kubik, courtesy of Wikipedia

 

Irena Sendler saved 2,500 Jewish children. That’s more than twice the number of Jews saved by Oskar Schindler! She used her position to do what she believed no one else could. She risked her life, enduring torture and ridicule at the hands of the Nazis, and almost being killed, only to go right back out and do it again.

I can’t think of a more courageous woman than Irena. She reminds me that sometimes we have the ability to help a person, and we always should. It wasn’t her fight, but she fought it anyway. Those children mattered to her, and she knew she could make a difference, so she did. Imagine the 2,500 children she saved, and how many people’s lives that affects. Those 2,500 people now have children and grandchildren, all of whom wouldn’t even exist today if it weren’t for the courage of this woman.

 

A tree planted in Irena’s honor, photo courtesy of iwka.wordpress.com

 

“I did nothing special. Any decent person would do the same thing under the circumstances. When somebody is drowning, you reach in to save them whether you can swim or not. Race, religion, nationality don’t matter.”  -Irena Sendler

Isn’t her humility incredible? When we go through hardships in our life, stop for a second and look at the big picture. Not to say our problems aren’t relevant, but just remember, no matter our situation, we can change this world, just like Irena did. We may not save thousands of lives, but if we can affect just one person for the better, then our life means something more.

 

Is there a woman you know personally who inspires you and others in some way? Is there a woman from history that you look up to? There are no guidelines–if a woman is inspiring to you in ANY way, it counts!

Please email me if you have a lady you want to see featured in Bring It Like a Broad.

You can also email me with any questions or comments you may have: theog@thebonafidebroad.com.

 

Until next time,

***If you like this post, PLEASE share it on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, StumbleUpon, or wherever the hell you want!!!***

***We want to know your opinion on anything you read in this article, so please COMMENT. All opinions are important, whether they are positive or negative. We want to hear from you!***

***This is a new blog, so each time you share our posts with your friends or comment, it helps us to grow! Thank you Broads, because without you we are NOTHING!***

Information for this article was taken from:

wikipedia.org

irenesendler.org

iwka.wordpress.com

patch.com

 



 

I’m the founder of The Bonafide Broad, and a thirty-something broad originally from the Pacific Northwest. I now live in Flagstaff, Arizona, with my guy, Mr. OG. When I’m not busy rescuing kittens from tall trees, carrying babies from burning buildings, and trying to establish world peace, I work for the school district in Flagstaff, and I run this blog.